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Microsoft Is Downloading Windows 10 to Your System

So, you’ve spent months looking at that stupid Windows 10 icon popping up in your system tray and you’ve avoided clicking on it. You know being a beta tester for Microsoft isn’t really in your best interest. You decided to wait until your IT partner let you know everything was humming along and it was safe to upgrade your OS. Good on you! Unfortunately, Microsoft has decided that for those users who install updates automatically, it’s beneficial for your computer upgrade experience to go ahead and download those files to your PC for you.
Woody Leonhard over at InfoWorld wrote this past Monday that Microsoft is download between 3 and 10GB of data to those machines without user consent to “help customers prepare their devices for Windows 10 by downloading the files necessary for future installation.” Um, Microsoft doesn’t seem to understand what “boundaries” means…..

According to Woody:

Last week I wrote that I was skeptical of early reports that Microsoft was pushing 3GB to 6GB of data onto Win7 and Win8.1 PCs completely unbidden. Microsoft isn’t that stupid, is it?

Man, was I naïve. I got my comeuppance over the weekend, as people who would absolutely never click on the “Reserve your free upgrade” or “Schedule your free upgrade” button told me they have a hidden C:\$Windows.~BT folder full of Win10 crapware that weighs in at 3GB, 6GB, or even 10GB.

By early this morning I’d received reliable reports from every continent (“except Antarctica,” as my son loves to say) showing that Windows 7 and 8.1 customers are getting clobbered with unwanted data, apparently pushed through the Automatic Update mechanism.
I say “apparently” because the systems that seem to be getting the gunk:

-Are running Windows 7 SP1 or Windows 8.1 Update 1
-Are running with Windows Automatic Update turned on
-Are not connected to a Windows Update server or, if they are connected, they can access Windows Update directly; that may happen if a user on a domain-attached PC has admin rights, or if they’re setup to access Windows Update directly while, for example, on the road

Fortunately, Woody gives us some steps you can take to rid your PC of this Microsoft provided virus. If you are the do it yourself type, take a look at the article and follow the steps-they will tell you how to find out if you have this menace-and if you have it, how to rid yourself of it.

 

 

 

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